News, updates, and happenings with the Kragnes family: Phil, our Seeing Eye Dogs, and (me) Rebecca.

I have been asked to write about how I regained access to my Facebook Account after as a blind person I failed the test of identification of photos my FB friends. I had a friend take a picture of my ID, sent it to the FB team, and had my account restored.

The sad truth is that I don’t know why my account was blocked, so I didn’t learn from the experience. When my account was restored, I was sent a list of things I could do to not have my account blocked again. Of course my butter-fingers inadvertently hit the delete key on it, but they were pretty basic things like having one account, having a profile photo (which I think I do), using my real name and birthdate. Nothing stuck out at me and had me thinking, “Oh that’s why my account was blocked! Let me fix that.” The next FB task is to figure out this trusted contact thing, so someone can restore my account if need be. Once again, it certainly wasn’t obvious to me, so after combing through it again, I’ll probably have to get a sighted person to look at it when I can and meanwhile hope I don’t do whatever it was I did to get it blocked the first time.

Speaking of having a sighted person available, Lainey Finegold has written a very nice piece about everyone asking a question I hear often. “Can’t you get a sighted person to look at that for you?” People like to think my husband is sighted or that we have a care taker always on-hand. We do have a volunteer reader who comes once a week. We try to wait and have a list of things ready for her besides our mail, but some things can’t wait. Plainly and simply, sometimes this question is a cop-out/excuse *not to provide something in accessible format. Obviously Lainey’s piece advertises her services, but it still makes some very good points about this plaguing question. Read it here.
“Can’t Someone Read that to You?: Dissolving Stereotypes of Blindness: http://lflegal.com/2013/06/blind-privacy/

Lainey has a second post about a worldwide battle blind and visually impaired people have recently won. I put links to the petition on my Twitter and Facebook hours before my FB account was blocked. There’s a part of me which wonders if that might have something to do with it, but anyway … Blind people all over the world are now going to have access to more books. Publishers and other corporations tried to block it by saying if it was available in audio, we should buy it. First, Audio books are more expensive than print. Second, this would be like saying to all of you sighted people that all libraries will close. Stevie Wonder even got into the act, which of course I love. There’s a direct link to his comments from Lainey’s page below.
Historic Copyright Victory for Blind Readers:
http://lflegal.com/2013/06/wipo/

I’ll close with one more little battle I’ve won. In January, I wrote about a wonderful new app for my iPhone on which I could write in braille. I loved it, because typing with one finger isn’t my thing and goes very slow. One of the big annoyances was not being able to use it with audio (usually music) in the background, so every time I wanted to use it, the music had to stop. I have been waiting none-too-patiently for this app to update and hadn’t heard anything for months. On Wednesday a very similar app was released called MBraille. MBraille can be used successfully with audio plus it allows for contracted or grade II braille. I can post directly to Twitter, Facebook, E-Mail, or text from it and can paste into other edit fields. It’s not advanced enough to have a spell checker yet, so I’ll be writing these more permanent blogs on the computer. Still, this is such a great step forward!

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Comments on: "personal and universal accessibility battles" (1)

  1. Cindy Flerman said:

    Hi Rebecca, I am new to the IPhone. What do I need to get MBraille? Do I need anything else in addition to use MBraille with an IPhone? I have an Apple IOS-5 that I am just learning to use via the NBP book.-Cindy Flerman

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